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RocKabul [dir: Travis Beard]

CULTURE: A documentary tells the story of the rise of the first Afghan metal band and their fall under the weight of the ultra-conservative society that surrounds them.

Midnight Traveler [dir: Hassan Fazili]

The Fazili family shoots their perilous journey from Afghanistan through the Balkan migration route to an uncertain future on three mobile phones.

A Dog Called Money [dir: Seamus Murphy]

Across Afghanistan, Kosovo, and Washington DC, musician PJ Harvey and photojournalist Seamus Murphy craft a beautifully shot, sensitively edited film on observation, experience, and the creative process.

Laila at the Bridge [dir: Elizabeth Mirzaei, Gulistan Mirzaei]

DRUGS: Laila at the Bridge takes the viewer on a harrowing journey to Kabul’s dark underpass, following a woman who attempts to save as many drug addicts as she can.

The Breadwinner/Tehran Taboo [dir: Nora Twomey/ Ali Soozandeh]

ANIMATED MOVIES: Girls dressed as boys in Kabul and Tehran’s underworld of sex, drugs and rave music are portrayed through the eyes of children in the animated movies The Breadwinner and Tehran Taboo.

Mads Mikkelsen – CPH:Dox

Social experiments, nudity and methods to the madness – don’t miss this year’s edition of CPH:Dox.

What Tomorrow Brings [dir: Beth Murphy]

AFGHANISTAN: If you want to run a school for girls in Afghanistan, you might have to check your water for poison each morning. Is it worth it?

Sonita [dir: Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami]

Is the credibility of a documentary film in danger when the director changes the life story being portrayed in order to get the saleable result he or she wants?

Dugma – The Button [dir: Pål Refsdal]

EURODOK: Two young men are waiting to be called to action as suicide bombers in Syria. Pål Refsdal’s recent documentary depicts a surprisingly intimate portrait.

1,000 Times Good Night [dir: Erik Poppe]

In Erik Poppe’s latest film, photographer Rebecca states that she is furious with people who do not care. For the true war photographers of our time, such as Alexandra Boulat or Zoriah Miller, the job is more profound than that.
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