Carmen Gray 12 POSTS
Carmen is a freelance film critic and regular contributor to Modern Times Review.
email: carmengray@gmail.com

Articles/information:

To set out for the Moon
(Hamada)

Hamada turns the attention to the rocky, wind-eroded desert of the Western Sahara, where the Sahrawi people have resided in refugee camps for more than 40 years.

Day-to-day life amongst a pro-Russian battalion in Ukraine
(Their Own Republic)

Their Own Republic by Russian director Aliona Polunina caused quite a fury at this year‘s Doclisboa due to its pro-Russian stance. The documentary nonetheless offers an interesting insight into the side of the Ukrainian conflict rarely portrayed in western media.

Invisible cities
(Charleroi, The Land of 60 Mountains)

Filmmaker Guy-Marc Hinant attempts to reclaim the good name of his hometown by uncovering lost stories long hidden within the slag heaps of the city’s memory.

When a war reporter chooses a side in conflict
(Chris the Swiss)

An intriguing portrait of a war reporter that died under murky circumstances during the 90s in wartime Yugoslavia, after trading in his pen for a more active role in the bloody conflict.

The mirage of utopia
(Near and Elsewhere)

An essay-documentary meditating on future visions and utopias holds a dark heart given the current state of our society.

Down the fake news rabbit hole
(Our New President)

A new documentary examines the Trump campaign and the breadth of the influence of «fake news» exclusively through the eyes of Russian media sources.

A study of Baltic poetic documentary
(Bridges of Time)

Pioneers of Baltic poetic documentary reflect on a revolutionary wave of cinema that in an era of Soviet occupation took a stand for inner freedom.

Madness as seen from the inside
(Days of Madness)

Damian Nenadić’s first feature length documentary is a raw revelation of psychiatric illness in Croatia, using footage shot solely by the protagonists themselves.

In the hallway of the Yugoslav past
(Hotel Jugoslavija)

Hotel Jugoslavija appears as a mirror image of the Yugoslav glory and downfall, symbolised by the once grand and luxurious hotel in the capital of a country that ceased to exist.

Austrian nazism revisited
(The Waldheim Waltz)

The Waltz of Waldheim poses the question whether a fascist threat suppressed and unexamined on a national scale has ever really been defeated.