Book review

Book reviews (non-fiction)

In power for eight years
(We Were Eight Years in Power)

Barack Obama’s eight years as America’s first black president indirectly paved the way for the country’s «first white president», according to one of America’s most influential African-American writers.

The structural cruelty of American prisons
(Unusually Cruel)

Marc Morjé Howard’s book provides a shocking picture of America’s treatment of convicts through a detailed comparison of the European and American Prison systems.

The devil is in the distractions
(Solitude)

Solitude is an occasionally interesting reflection on the many qualities of loneliness in a time where we’re almost always connected with others.

Varoufakis’ magical realism
(Talking to My Daughter About the Economy)

By cutting the principles of capitalism to the bone and by using language that is straightforward, Yanis Varoufakis pulls out the essence of modern economy.

Agamben and the Ethics of Abnegation
(The Coming Community)

The Coming Community is a rich, complex and at times impenetrable text drawing you into the realm of the profane before finally presenting us to «the solution».

Heretics the fun way
(Heretics!)

The new cartoon and graphic narrative Heretics!: The Wondrous (and Dangerous) Beginnings of Modern Philosophy, offers a smooth beginning to some of the wisest thinkers of early modern thoughts.

The conqueror of the useless
(Werner Herzog)

A genuine democracy must be open to dissent, the different and the useless. Only through this “conquest of the useless” can we get closer to the truth.

Prescript Killjoy
(Narcocapitalism)

Narcocapitalism is a short book about modern psychoactive pharmaceuticals, but also a theory of how to gain control over the social body.

America’s racism
(From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation)

In Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s insightful book, historical and contemporary consequences of racism are explored along with the promise of a new potential for Black liberation.

Power in the age of impotence
(Futurability)

Franco Berardi suggests to us a new activism – not through revolutionary changes, but through a systematic effort to develop a humane and free society.
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