.reviews

Reviews of documentaries (and some non-fiction films)

The death of (representative) politics
(I Had a Dream)

Two Italian women look back at a decade of representative politics fighting for women’s rights in the (post) Berlusconi era. Amused, dispirited, annoyed, and anguished they assess how much – or how little – they managed to change.

Invisible cities
(Charleroi, The Land of 60 Mountains)

Filmmaker Guy-Marc Hinant attempts to reclaim the good name of his hometown by uncovering lost stories long hidden within the slag heaps of the city’s memory.

When a war reporter chooses a side in conflict
(Chris the Swiss)

An intriguing portrait of a war reporter that died under murky circumstances during the 90s in wartime Yugoslavia, after trading in his pen for a more active role in the bloody conflict.

The mirage of utopia
(Near and Elsewhere)

An essay-documentary meditating on future visions and utopias holds a dark heart given the current state of our society.

The iconic Glock
(Weapon of Choice)

Despite a somewhat sprawled narrative, this collection of stories around the gun named Glock is worth your attention.

The apocalyptic face of capitalism
(Welcome to Sodom)

The shocking reality of Ghana’s electronic waste dump Sodom reveals the truth about our unending need for the newer and better in Western consumerism.

Down the fake news rabbit hole
(Our New President)

A new documentary examines the Trump campaign and the breadth of the influence of «fake news» exclusively through the eyes of Russian media sources.

Laila, mother of the addicts
(Laila at the Bridge)

Laila at the Bridge takes the viewer on a harrowing journey to Kabul’s dark underpass, following a woman who attempts to save as many drug addicts as she can.

An extremist self-portrait
(Exit)

How do you opt out of a community that expects life-long allegiance and responds to dissenters with brutal retributions? In Exit, Karen Winther depicts the hazardous struggle for liberation.

A changing Chinese society
(Up the Mountain)

Up the Mountain is a portrait how the shedding of the old is making way for the new in today‘s China.
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