SOCIETY: Maite Alberdi's film cleverly touches on a delicate theme and invites us with compassion and tenderness to reflect on isolation, the rigours of patriarchal society, and the organisation of work and family.
Marc Molas Carol
Marc Molas Carol
Catalan music producer and spanish editor at Modern Times Review.
Published date: November 18, 2020

Maite Alberdi is one of the most important Latin-American voices in the documentary field. In 2011 she debuted with The Lifeguard (El Salvavidas). With Tea Time (La Once) in 2014, she received more than 12 international awards and a nomination for Best Ibero-American Film at the 2016 Goya Awards. Her last film The Grown-ups (Los Niños) garnered 10 international awards including at DocsBarcelona. The present documentary The Mole Agent (El Agente Topo) was already born under the good auspice of the Best Pitch at IDFA in 2017 and has been released this year 2020 at the Sundance World Cinema Documentary Competition.

Playing with format

The Mole Agent is a fiction that plays with the documentary format, or a documentary stitched together with a fictional plot. It is a stylish combination of observational documentary and film noir, but it is also a tender excuse and a harrowing reflection. An excuse inviting the audience to share time with a group of octogenarians and nonagenarians and live through the harshness of oblivion and the incomprehensible invisibility that Chilean society often grants to …


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