CLIMATE: Enriched with animated segments depicting the legends and culture of the Inuit and Chukchi people, The Book of the Sea reveals a side of Russia rarely seen.

Nick Holdsworth
Nick Holdsworth
Journalist, writer, author, filmmaker and film and TV industry expert – Central and Eastern Europe and Russia.
Published date: August 18, 2019

The Book of the Sea

(Kniga morya)

Aleksei Vakhrushev

High Latitudes ltd

Russia

Aleksei Vakhrushev’s The Book of the Sea is a hypnotically beautiful study of a life vanishingly rare as the global climate crisis melts the polar caps, dooming what has endured for millennia.

An Inuk of the Yupik Inuit people who live on the frozen coast of Russia’s far northeastern Bering Strait, Vakhrushev – a graduate of Moscow’s famous VGIK film school – chronicles the lives and challenges of native people living both literally and metaphorically on the edge.

Nearly a century after Robert J. Flaherty’s seminal silent film study of Canada’s Inuit, Nanook of the North, the lives of Russia’s and other natives of the Arctic regions are rarely seen in such close up, intimate detail.

https://vimeo.com/294771208

Vakhrushev, who directs and produces through his High Latitudes company, understands both the haunting beauty of his native landscapes – the frozen seas, the midnight sun – and the depth of pain and despair that modern times, governance and global warming are bringing to such communities.

the lives of Russia’s and other natives of the Arctic regions are rarely seen in such close up, intimate detail.


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Life vanishingly rare

CLIMATE: Enriched with animated segments depicting the legends and culture of the Inuit and Chukchi people, The Book of the Sea reveals a side of Russia rarely seen.

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