The allure of work as process and pleasure

GENRE: In a deliciously written book, Salomé Aguilera Skvirsky delineates, dissects, and names a visual genre we are all familiar with but have not yet learned to appreciate its full potential and implications.

The Process Genre. Cinema and the Aesthetic of Labor
Author: Salomé Aguilera Skvirsky
Publisher: Duke University Press,


(Translated from English by Google Gtranslate)

«Nooooooo! Why!?!» We had only reached scene four in The Most Unsatisfying Video in the World ever made, when my partner couldn’t take it anymore. It had been agonising from the outset, watching a cake being cut into meaninglessly messy, uneven slices. When a bag of Skittles and another of M&Ms were presented in the frame, with resigned cynicism, she (correctly) foresaw that they would be mixed in the same bowl. All done to the monotone-optimistic tunes of the typical how-to-video background music. It was painful to witness, but still makeable. It was not any longer when a third ruler-line was made on a piece of white paper trashing the two first lines for no other reason than . . .

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Nina Trige Andersen
Nina Trige Andersen is a historian and freelance journalist. She is a regular contributor to Modern Times Review.

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